Somalia OFFICE TO MONITOR AND COMBAT TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS

Somalia

OFFICE TO MONITOR AND COMBAT TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS
Special Case

Somalia remains a Special Case for the twelfth consecutive year. During the reporting period, the Federal Government of Somalia (FGS) controlled Mogadishu, but had limited influence outside the capital city. The self-declared independent Republic of Somaliland and semi-autonomous Federal State of Puntland retained control of security and law enforcement in their respective regions. In August 2013, federal officials and Jubaland regional leaders agreed to establish the Interim Juba Administration in southern Somalia. The FGS focused on capacity-building and securing Mogadishu and government facilities from attacks by the al-Qaeda-affiliated terrorist organization al-Shabaab, which retained control of many rural areas in southern and central Somalia. The African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) commenced a new round of military operations in early March 2014 to recover al-Shabaab-controlled territory. The government possessed minimal capacity to investigate and prosecute most crimes, including human trafficking. In addition, officials across Somalia generally lacked an understanding of trafficking crimes, which they often conflated with smuggling. Justice was primarily provided through military courts. Civilian courts remained limited in number and capacity but functioned during the year. Many Somalis continued to rely on the traditional justice system. Due to capacity constraints, Somali authorities struggled to address human trafficking, yielding minimal results in terms of prosecution, protection, and prevention efforts in all regions.

Scope and Magnitude: Somalia is a source, transit, and destination country for men, women, and children subjected to forced labor and sex trafficking. Information regarding trafficking in Somalia remains extremely difficult to obtain or verify. Victims are reportedly primarily trafficked within the country from Somalia’s southern and central regions to the regions of Puntland and Somaliland in the north. In Somaliland, women act as recruiters and intermediaries to take victims to Puntland State, Djibouti, and Ethiopia for domestic servitude or sex trafficking. Somali women and girls may also endure sex trafficking in Garowe, Las Anod (Sool region), and pirate towns such as Harardheere. Pirates also use children aged 15 to 17 to carry out their illegal activities. Although pirate groups continued to decline in numbers and influence in 2013, stakeholders indicated that these criminal groups turned towards human smuggling and trafficking as alternative income sources. In Somali society, Somali Bantus and Midgaan remain marginalized and sometimes kept in servitude by more powerful Somali clan members as domestic workers, farm laborers, and herders. Due to poverty and an inability to provide care for all family members, some Somalis willingly surrender custody of their children to people with whom they share familial ties and clan linkages; some of these children may become victims of forced labor or sex trafficking. Most child laborers work within their own households or family businesses. Somalia remains a predominantly pastoral and nomadic society, with only 30 percent of children estimated to attend school. Children may be forced into labor in agriculture, domestic work, herding livestock, selling or portering khat (a mild narcotic), crushing stones, or in the construction industry.

Somalia has more than 1.1 million internally displaced persons (IDP) within its territory. “Gatekeepers” in control of some IDP camps reportedly force girls and women to provide sex acts in exchange for food and services available within the camps. At times, they charge rent or fees for otherwise-free basic services and sell the area they control within a camp to other “gatekeepers,” establishing a cycle of debt for IDPs that makes them vulnerable to inherited bondage. Additionally, displaced persons in camps or congregated along coastal areas and seeking to be smuggled to nearby African countries, Europe, or the Middle East remain particularly vulnerable to trafficking. Traffickers reportedly prey on young women and children, mostly IDPs from southern and central Somalia, at marketplaces and in the streets, falsely promising them lucrative jobs outside Somalia. IDPs within these camps claimed that clan, regional, and government armed forces, as well as al-Shabaab, recruited from these camps.

Traffickers smuggle Somali women, sometimes via Djibouti, to destinations in the Middle East, including Yemen and Syria, where they frequently endure domestic servitude or forced prostitution. Somali men experience conditions of forced labor as herdsmen and workers in the Gulf states. Traffickers smuggle children to Saudi Arabia through Yemen and then force them to beg on the streets. Reports of human smuggling remain geographically widespread in Somalia, including along its long coastline. Reports suggest that traffickers use the same networks and methods as those used by smugglers. Dubious employment agencies facilitate human trafficking by targeting individuals desiring to migrate to the Gulf states or Europe for employment. Migration via Puntland and Yemen to Saudi Arabia appeared less viable in 2013 due to Saudi Arabia’s strengthened border enforcement and the forced return of tens of thousands of reportedly illegal migrants. NGOs and international organizations reported that Somalis increasingly sought to move to other destinations in Africa, including Kenya and South Africa. Authorities in Somaliland reported an increase in the smuggling or kidnapping of children and unemployed university graduates, who later move through Ethiopia and Sudan and perhaps are held hostage by networks in Libya en route to Europe and other destinations in the Middle East. NGOs estimated 50 young people were smuggled out of Somaliland each month, some of whom may be trafficking victims. During the year, the Government of Tanzania investigated 14 Somali businessmen reportedly using forged documents to facilitate the smuggling of Somalis to South Africa and Europe. Members of the Somali diaspora use false offers of marriage to lure unsuspecting victims, many of whom include relatives, to Europe or the United States, where they force them into prostitution and domestic servitude.

Traffickers reportedly subject Somali children fleeing al-Shabaab and seeking refuge in Kenya to forced labor or sexual exploitation. Refugee children at the Dadaab and Kakuma refugee camps in Kenya may also encounter exploitation in prostitution and forced labor. Trucks transporting goods from Kenya to Somalia return to Kenya with young girls and women; traffickers acquire these young girls and women and place them in brothels in Nairobi or Mombasa or send them to destinations outside Kenya. Somali traffickers known as “makhalis” control the networks, but truck drivers also exploit these girls in prostitution.

The estimated 20,000 undocumented Ethiopians in northern Somalia remain vulnerable to trafficking as they seek employment in Puntland and Somaliland to fund subsequent travel to the Middle East. Traffickers smuggle Ethiopian women through Somalia to Yemen and onward to other destinations in the Middle East, where they subsequently force them into domestic servitude and prostitution. Ethiopian children travel to Somaliland seeking employment but may end up begging on the streets or vulnerable to other forms of forced labor.

Child Soldiers: During the year, the Somali National Security Forces (SNSF), anti-Shabaab militias, and AMISOM forces continued their offensive against al-Shabaab. The Federal Government of Somalia expressed full commitment to eliminating the use of child soldiers among the ranks of the SNSF and made incremental progress on the Child Soldier National Action Plan, including signing the standard operating procedures for children separated from armed groups in February 2014. The SNSF also promulgated a Code of Conduct that, among other provisions, prohibited recruitment of anyone under 18-years-old into the military services. Nonetheless, according to UN reports, the SNSF recruited or used children during the period of April to December 2013. In addition, reports indicated that Somaliland and AMISOM forces also allegedly used children for support during the year. Most Somalis lacked birth certificates. Without an established birth registration system, verifying claims of recruitment and use of child soldiers remained difficult, except in the most blatant circumstances involving al-Shabaab terrorists.

Throughout areas beyond state control, al-Shabaab frequently recruited children as young as 8-years-old for use by its militias through abduction or deception. This terrorist group continued forced recruitment at both Koranic schools and other educational facilities, and punished teachers and parents who refused to send their children to its training camps. Recruitment also took place in IDP and Kenya-based refugee camps. Al-Shabaab continued to use children for direct participation in hostilities and other support functions in southern and central Somalia, including for planting roadside bombs and other explosive devices, serving as human shields during incursions, carrying out assassinations, providing intelligence, portering, and working in domestic service or in raising cash crops. The UN reported al-Shabaab’s recruitment, from April to September 2013, of over 178 children, including through abduction. Al-Shabaab also forcibly recruited young girls and forced them to “marry” al-Shabaab militia leaders; the girls were subsequently exploited in sexual servitude and used for logistical support and intelligence gathering.

Government Efforts: Somaliland and Puntland authorities made efforts during the reporting period to combat trafficking. Due to capacity constraints and the ongoing campaign to degrade al-Shabaab and secure Mogadishu, the FGS lacked trafficking awareness, proper training, resources, and the ability to effectively prosecute trafficking offenses, protect victims, or prevent the crime. The pre-1991 penal code (applicable at the federal and regional levels) outlaws forced labor and other forms of trafficking in persons. Article 455 prohibits and penalizes slavery, prescribing penalties of five to 20 years’ imprisonment. Article 464 prohibits forced labor, prescribing penalties of six months’ to five years’ imprisonment. Article 457 prohibits the transferring, disposing, taking possession, or holding of a person, and prescribes penalties of three to 12 years’ imprisonment. All of these penalties appear sufficiently stringent. Article 408(1) prohibits compelled prostitution of a person through violence or threats, prescribing penalties of two to six years’ imprisonment, which appears sufficiently stringent but not commensurate with those prescribed for other serious crimes, such as rape. The constitution, which remains provisional until the holding of a national referendum for a permanent version, prohibits slavery, servitude, trafficking, and forced labor under Article 14. Article 29(6) prohibits the use of children in armed conflict, and Article 405 prohibits all forms of prostitution. The Somali National Police retained responsibility for investigating and enforcing such laws; however, they remained understaffed and undertrained and—representative of the challenges across the judicial system generally—lacked capacity to enforce these laws effectively in 2013. The federal government did not investigate or prosecute trafficking crimes during the reporting period.

The Puntland State administration and Somaliland possessed functioning legal systems and some law enforcement capacity. In Puntland, the Ministry of Women Development and Family Affairs oversaw anti-trafficking efforts, and the police force in Garowe operated an anti-trafficking unit, though it lacked proper training. Provisions under Islamic law in Puntland criminalize the murder of smuggled or trafficked persons, prescribing penalties of between one and five years’ imprisonment. In March 2013, Puntland police intercepted seven girls kidnapped from south-central Somalia destined for Hargeisa, Somaliland, for unknown purposes; the police arrested the two men transporting the girls, although the resolution of this case remained unknown at the close of the reporting period.

Laws in Somaliland prohibit forced labor, involuntary servitude, and slavery. The Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs in Somaliland operated a specialized unit to respond to suspected trafficking cases, and police and immigration officers played an active role in anti-trafficking efforts. Somaliland officials made efforts to convict human smugglers—including those potentially intending to exploit migrants in forced labor or sex trafficking upon their final destination. In November 2013, Somaliland officials arrested four Somaliland military personnel for the alleged smuggling of 11 Somalis from south-central Somalia into Ethiopia. Officials did not provide additional details on this case, including whether these adults appeared destined for forced labor at their final destinations. In addition, in April 2013, a Somaliland court in Gabiley sentenced nine men, convicted of human trafficking, to between three to six months’ imprisonment; although officials reported that these men participated in a network moving Somalis to Libya and other destinations, it remained unclear if the workers who were being smuggled were intended for exploitation upon arrival.

No governmental entity utilized formal procedures for the proactive identification of victims; however, in 2013, officials from Puntland and Somaliland continued to develop a referral process to guide officials in transferring trafficking victims detained, arrested, or placed in protective custody to NGOs that provided care. No governmental entity provided protective services to victims of trafficking, although IOM and local organizations provided reintegration services to rescued trafficking victims in Puntland and Somaliland. Neither the federal government nor the regional governments of Somaliland and Puntland provided financial or in-kind assistance to organizations assisting victims. In Puntland, IOM staff trained officials on victim identification and assistance procedures. These organizations also placed child victims with families for care.

The Puntland Ministry of Women and Children received the seven girls intercepted in March 2013 and conducted family tracing. In October 2013, Somaliland authorities worked with IOM and its donor-supported Migration Response Center in Hargeisa to establish a mobile health clinic for the IDPs surrounding Mahamed Mooge settlement and a rehabilitation center for 150 street children. In addition, in June 2013, the Somaliland Ministries of the Interior and Resettlement, Rehabilitation, and Reintegration cooperated with Ethiopian immigration officials to assist in the IOM-funded voluntary return of 42 migrants stranded at the Migration Response Center in Hargeisa. Nonetheless, Somaliland officials appeared overwhelmed with humanitarian cases and illegal immigration from Ethiopia, which often hindered identification and protection of potential trafficking victims. Government officials provided no data clarifying whether children who involuntarily engaged in prostitution or the commission of crimes across Somali territory gained protection from charges of crime under Somali law. There were no legal alternatives to the removal of foreign trafficking victims from Somalia to countries where they may face hardship or retribution; however, government officials identified no foreign victims during the year.

Information on FGS efforts to protect trafficking victims remained limited. Since December 2013, Saudi Arabia has forcibly returned to Mogadishu 28,000 Somalis deemed to have been illegally present in Saudi Arabia, some of whom may have been trafficking victims. The Somali government cooperated with IOM to respond to this large-scale deportation and possible refoulement, but did not provide any funding to support provision of assistance nor reintegration programming. In 2013, UNICEF and officials with the Ministries of National Security and Defense developed referral procedures for the reception and handover of children identified to have been associated with al-Shabaab. FGS Ministers signed these standard operating procedures in February 2014. In addition, the SNSF cooperated with UNICEF to refer potential child soldiers to rehabilitation programs. The FGS, in partnership with UN agencies and AMISOM, developed and began to implement a comprehensive strategy for the screening, rehabilitation, and reintegration of al-Shabaab defectors; following immediate screening of children, the guidelines of the program require the children be transferred to UNICEF for placement in rehabilitation programs. The SNSF promulgated a Code of Conduct that prohibited recruitment of individuals under 18 years of age.

Authorities across Somalia made minimal efforts to prevent trafficking during the year. In 2013, Puntland authorities partnered with IOM to establish an anti- trafficking coordinating body and raise awareness. Given the reported increase in youth leaving Somaliland, in June 2013, the President of Somaliland established a seven-member migration prevention and job creation committee to stem illegal migration of Somalis. Officials also advocated for increased school enrollment and began cooperation with Ethiopia to intercept human smugglers. The Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs conducted awareness campaigns across Somaliland, engaging with religious leaders, youth, and civil society organizations. In 2013, the FGS began implementation of the UN-sponsored action plan to address the recruitment and use of child soldiers, signed by the former transitional federal government in July 2012. Overall implementation of the action plan remained limited—with inaction on key items, such as the creation of child protection units. SNSF officials and African Union doctors continued to use medical checks and interviews to screen for underage candidates during recruitment, though it continued to prove difficult to verify the age of candidates lacking a birth certificate or other documentation. In 2012, no funding was provided to agencies for labor inspections, and no inspectors were employed to enforce labor laws. Authorities across Somalia did not make any discernible efforts to reduce the demand for forced labor or commercial sex acts. Somalia is not a party to the 2000 UN TIP Protocol.

our CURRENT VICTIMS AND SURVIVORS

Updated 9th July 2015

Currently we have just over 13, 143 children and 260 adult victims

Children:

South Africa: 9,685 of which 200 is babies of the victims

United States of America 1,395

Various African children: 1,665

Various other countries: 398

Adult victims:

South Africa: 135

American: 40

Other African states: 85

Accordingly to African.org human trafficking can’t be a big problem, as there is only 248 official missing reports on children in South Africa accordingly to the SAPS at least 1,100 might be missing but classed as run away children.

So why do we sit with 9, 685 of South African children.

To break the South African numbers down by race:

Black South African children: 1,497

Colored South African children: 1,515

White South African children: 6,326

Other South African: 347

A lot of the children say there were more black children with them, but they get sold quicker, the sad reality is, on the black market a black child is sold for his organs very quickly, there race is in demand for organs, mutti and a lot of other horrible things, so a lot of them won´t be found.

OUr victims and survivors until October 2014

Our victims that we had up until October 2014 and that was reunited with families from the following places.

South Africa: 750

United States of America: 750

West África: 624

North África: 214

India: 1450

México: 1698

Central America: 2120

South America: 1894

China: 210

Various unknown: 725

These are victims that became survivors and ending them home was a safe option.

1000 adult victims, were given protection, and are now based over Mexico and is enjoying freedom and living live to us fullest.

Breaking down the South African victims:

300 was from Cape Town, mainly gang areas where gang crime is high,

200 was from Pretoria, JHB area.

125 was from Eastern Cape

125 was from Natal and rest of South Africa.

Our foundation relocated 15 families from the Cape Flats to a safer location as their children´s abduction was ruled gang related. People they knew where involve with drugs and making a family member as a trade seem to be the norm these days.

Our STructure

Our structure:

Our foundation is currently based abroad, and are dealing with a lot of African children that are traffic to other parts of the world. We work with any nationality, any race, adult victims, child victims, sex, child, labor and human trafficking victims.

Our safe house assist with educating the children, helping the adults to learn a trade and assisting in their legal matters regarding the trafficking. We also try and locate their families, which can be difficult at times, for the fact that not all police forces has missing reports on all missing people.

We are looking at operating a safe house or two in South Africa, for the victims that are found abroad and also for local victims in South Africa and surrounding countries.

We are also looking at the demand to start an EMPOWER THE LESS FORTUNATE in South Africa, the need by the amount of victims that are found is huge.

Armor of God came around in 2009, we were talking about our view of the youth and on trafficking. Not just for the sex trade but the murder of children for organs and various others trafficking needs out there. All of us, that are involve with the foundation, has been personally touched by trafficking. Dealt with victims and wanted to make a difference.

Some of us have rescue skills, and are using that to rescue children, or some of us use or medical skills, some is using their caring skills. Together we are making a difference, When we started we worked with adult victims mainly and we helped 2500 victims in our first year all over 18 and under 30. 200 victims left and went back to life on the street. The rest, got educated, found work and is progressing really well. The 200 dropped out at different times, and we discovered it is as soon as they have unsupervised internet time.

In 2010 and 2011 we dealt with a mixture of children and adults. We had a total of 5000 people come through our doors, 5 victims went to study for lawyers, some opened restaurants and others went to become teachers. Children went back to school and was reunited with families.

We discovered that roughly for every 100 people we help roughly 95 continue to be survivors. It is hard work, we started having in live in victim houses and becoming safe houses for children.

From end of 2012 we became a live in safe house that at the time could take 1000 victims, everything is done by volunteers.

We raise funds by attending 2 international festivals a year, and promoting anti trafficking days. We became involve with politicians that fight against trafficking.

IN 2013 we dealt with 100 South African victims of trafficking. It was a shock finding them trafficked through Mexico.

In 2014 our world turn upside down. We found a South African girl that was sold by her mother and 45 other children. Then another 350 South African children.

In April 2014 we became targets of traffickers hitting back to people who safe victims, lucky for us, with God´s Blessings, we did not get harmed, a few knock and bruises and threats but we live to tell the tail. But all our documents of our victims got stolen, only the documents that we received from the organizations that helps children. The silly people forgot we won’t keep important things on site.

Boy has God been testing us in 2014. By the end of 2014 we had 768 children in our care and only 5 staff. No real security. Then we entered 2015 with a lot of children and now we have 3012 kids as of today, 7thApril.

Our victims that we had up until October 2014 and that was reunited with families from the following places.

South Africa: 750

United States of America: 750

West África: 624

North África: 214

India: 1450

México: 1698

Central America: 2120

South America: 1894

China: 210

Various unknown: 725

These are victims that became survivors and ending them home was a safe option.

1000 adult victims, were given protection, and are now based over Mexico and is enjoying freedom and living live to us fullest.

Breaking down the South African victims:

300 was from Cape Town, mainly gang areas where gang crime is high,

200 was from Pretoria, JHB area.

125 was from Eastern Cape

125 was from Natal and rest of South Africa.

Our foundation relocated 15 families from the Cape Flats to a safer location as their children´s abduction was ruled gang related. People they knew where involve with drugs and making a family member as a trade seem to be the norm these days.

Updated 9th July 2015

Currently we have just over 13, 143 children and 260 adult victims

Children:

South Africa: 9,685 of which 200 is babies of the victims

United States of America 1,395

Various African children: 1,665

Various other countries: 398

Adult victims:

South Africa: 135

American: 40

Other African states: 85

Accordingly to African.org human trafficking can’t be a big problem, as there is only 248 official missing reports on children in South Africa accordingly to the SAPS at least 1,100 might be missing but classed as run away children.

So why do we sit with 9, 685 of South African children.

To break the South African numbers down by race:

Black South African children: 1,497

Colored South African children: 1,515

White South African children: 6,326

Other South African: 347

A lot of the children say there were more black children with them, but they get sold quicker, the sad reality is, on the black market a black child is sold for his organs very quickly, there race is in demand for organs, mutti and a lot of other horrible things, so a lot of them won´t be found.

We have Jewish children, Muslim children and various other religions, we don’t turn any away.

We have 98 that has already lost a kidney each and various others test that was done on their organs. Recent scars under 18 weeks old. Yet they were continued to be pimped out while having their organs harvested.

We have 352 pregnant girls (between the ages of 11 and 17), we have a lot of under 6 years old children.

Looking at the figures, the amount of people our foundation is made up off, we have to decide on how to make Africa aware of the problem facing their citizens.

We put our lives on the line every day, working with these children, rescuing them, taking them to appointments and court. We will continue to do so until they are all safe.

We are assisting ministers in South Africa, to look at certain areas in the law for these victims, so that they can go back to South Africa to a safe house, until their cases is concluded. This is only in the beginning stages.

Any help, even just prayer is appreciated, or just sharing to raise awareness, that is just as important, anything small help.

God bless you

Our HIstory

OUR HISTORY

What began as a group of friends with a God-sized dream and a passion for setting others free has now grown into a worldwide, Christian non-profit organization dedicated to rescuing and restoring children enslaved in the sex-trade.

Armor of God foundation story began with the founding family sitting down with friends pondering on different issues. They were all affected by Human, sex and child trafficking, that personally touched their lives. It got all deep and meaningful, it was a real God moment and the first time we all thought we could make a difference. God planted the seeds and the rest fell into place.

The family was personal survivors from trafficking and felt that God will give them the strength to deal with their own heart ache, by helping others.

We all decided to start a rescue and safe haven for victims, where God can lead the way on how to help them. God then decided to put child victims on the door of the foundation.

We are aiming to work on virtually every continent with one main purpose – to see sex-slavery end in our lifetime.

Through the 5 years various young adults and adults has been saved, now we are working with children and seeing them being saved and the joy to see them being children again.

Our eyes has been opened to how our home countries are effected by trafficking and their denial in dealing with the problem.

And as long as sex-trafficking and child sexual exploitation exist in our world, we will continue to fight and be advocates on behalf of the enslaved and vulnerable.

This is our story – ordinary people with God-sized hearts that are passionate about setting others free.

Our Mission part 5

BE A VOICE FOR THE VOICELESS

Armor of God is committed to being a voice for the sexually exploited, vulnerable and poor who, in most cases, can’t speak up for themselves. We believe everyone has a right to be heard, especially those crying out for justice. Many times they are overlooked or tossed aside by society, but we are determined to be their voice – motivating and inspiring influencers to get involved and make a difference in the lives of the voiceless

Have you ever had the experience of talking to someone about an important issue and realized the person you were speaking with didn’t hear a word you said? It can be quite frustrating, can’t it? Now imagine a situation that’s many times worse.

For example, you were being sexually exploited and your cries for help fell on deaf ears. Or you were in such poverty that you couldn’t feed your own children and had to sit and watch them slowly die of starvation. It would be difficult to have hope that things could change for the better. Sadly, this is happening all over the world.

Will you stand up and fight for justice and do the right thing, even if it’s inconvenient or uncomfortable?

God wants His people to be a voice for those that can’t speak up for themselves; He wants us to be an advocate on their behalf – one that will stand up and fight for justice and do the right thing, even if it’s inconvenient or uncomfortable.

The Bible says, “Speak up for those who cannot speak for themselves; ensure justice for those being crushed. Yes, speak up for the poor and helpless, and see that they get justice” (Proverbs 31:8-9 NLT).

Armor of God is committed to being that voice – a voice for the voiceless, a voice for the poor, the sexually enslaved and the vulnerable. We’re committed to bringing justice to their cause through our many advocacy and awareness events.

So much of the world doesn’t even know the horrendous conditions and environments these children and families live in.

If Armor of God doesn’t share their stories with people who actually have the ability to make a difference, little will ever be accomplished.

Our mission part4

PROTECT THE VULNERABLE

Armor of God offers programs that help at-risk children and families reduce their children’s chances of being sold, lured or trafficked into the sex-trade.

Many children are forced into sexual slavery simply because they are poor and have little or no education. Armor of God is addressing these root problems head on.

A large percentage of children forced into human trafficking come from poverty-stricken communities where educational opportunities are scarce or where illegal drugs are rampant. In most cases, at-risk families can’t afford to send their children to school. As a result, their children enter the work force with little or no qualifications for a decent paying job. This makes them extremely vulnerable to sex traffickers that lure, bribe and falsely promise good jobs to them. Instead, these evil criminals enslave children into forced prostitution.

Unfortunately, there are even cases where children’s parents are desperate enough financially to push their own kids into a life of prostitution.

God wants His people to actively help those caught in poverty and give them a hand up in life – offering them a positive alternative to their seemingly hopeless situation.

The Bible says, “Do justice to the weak (poor) and fatherless; maintain the rights of the afflicted and needy. Deliver the poor and needy; rescue them out of the hand of the wicked” (Psalm 82:3-4 AMP). This means we have a responsibility to help protect vulnerable people, including at-risk children and families from evil human traffickers.

Deliver the poor and needy; rescue them out of the hand of the wicked” (Psalm 82:4 AMP).

Armor of God has stepped up to the challenge by offering prevention programs to at-risk children and families. We identify areas in the world that have extreme poverty and where children are being forced into the sex-trade, we take into consideration that countries like the USA has their own poverty areas that needs addressing. Then we offer financial assistance to families that need help enrolling their child or children in school. We pay for a child’s tuition, books, school supplies and uniform. If a family’s situation is severe enough, we may even provide meal assistance, as well. Each family’s needs are different, and therefore, require individual assessment. This is done by an Armor of God Rescue social worker.

Sometimes, there are no schools in a specific area where a family lives. In these cases, Armor of God Rescue will help pay for a child to relocate to one of our prevention homes, where they will be given a proper education, a safe place to live, food, medical care and all their daily needs.

There are also instances when children, especially in slum villages, fall behind in school because their parents can’t afford to send them consistently. This may even cause them to drop out altogether – increasing their chances of being trafficked. Armor of God Rescue established an after-school learning program to combat this issue. Our centers help children and young adults catch up on their schooling, so they can graduate successfully – giving them an opportunity to reach their dreams!

EMPOWER THE LESS FORTUNATE

Armor of God believes in empowering the less fortunate and giving them a hand up in life, not a handout. Our philosophy and goal is to help them become self-sustaining through one of our many assistance programs. Simply put, we don’t want to create a welfare system where children and families become dependent on our organization, but rather have a chance to become profitable through hard work and common sense. Some people are so poor, they’re even willing to sell their own children into the sex-trade to survive. Armor of God isn’t okay with that. We’re offering them a much better alternative…

According to the United Nation Millennium Report of 2012, “There were 456 million workers in the world living below the $1.25 a day poverty line in 2011. This means there are millions of poor people around the globe desperate to find a way to support their families financially, especially in rural areas. So desperate in fact, some are willing to sell illegal drugs or even their own children into the sex industry.

The Bible teaches us to be kind to the poor and offer them help in time of need. “Those who oppress the poor insult their Maker, but helping the poor honors him” (Proverbs 14:31 NLT).

We help the poor become independent through our self-sustaining projects.

Armor of God is compelled by God to help empower the poor and destitute, especially in rural areas where extreme poverty exists. We believe in offering them a hand up, not a handout. In other words, our goal is to teach them to become self-supportive over time through our many self-sustaining projects. These programs help families earn a good, stable income and offer them much better options other than illegal drugs or sex trafficking.

In short, Armor of God believes in providing hope and stability to the poor and vulnerable worldwide.

Armor of God Rescue staff will when possible start to travel extensively to churches, conferences and seminars raising awareness about sex trafficking, at-risk children and families and our role in combating and stopping modern day slavery in our generation.

Our goal is simple: get in front of as many influencers as possible, so they, in turn, can be advocates for those enslaved, poor and destitute

Our MIssion part 3

Our work includes:

RESCUE THE SEXUALLY EXPLOITED AND ENSLAVED

Armor of God rescues children and adults from red light districts, brothels and sexually abusive situations. Armor of God also rescues children and adults from now trafficking hot spots across the world.

Armor of God Rescue is committed to rescuing children from the sex trade and giving them the opportunity to fulfil their destinies. Our Rescue Agents risk their lives searching for under aged children in brothels, red light districts and sexually abusive situations.

Our Rescue Agents are committed to helping children escape, but many children feel trapped even if they are not physically locked up.

Traffickers plant fear into the hearts and minds of the children. They are too terrified to escape, even if the opportunity presented itself.

Poverty and lack of education entice parents to sell their children. Many children feel immense pressure from their families to continue earning money, despite their unbearable circumstances.

THE RESCUE

Our Rescue Agents visit red lights areas undercover and identify under aged children and adult victims.

Once identified, they will either:

Build trust with the children and offer the safest escape route possible.

Partner with anti-trafficking police to gain intelligence and help facilitate a raid.

The brothel managers, pimps, traffickers are often arrested and the premises shut down, meaning no more abuse can take place there.

Both methods of rescue are vital in fulfilling our vision to see child slavery ended in our lifetimes.

The same methods get used to rescue adults in sex trafficking and human trafficking.

We also attend rescue mission where tip offs have been received by police.

As of December 2014, 100% of rescued children will then find love and restoration in our Armor of God Rescue Homes. Depending on circumstance, the children will either return to their families, or are placed in our aftercare homes.

RESTORE THE ABUSED

Armor of God provides rescued children the intensive care and love they need to recover from the traumatic effects of sexual abuse and sexual exploitation. We provide them medical help, counseling, schooling, vocational training and all daily needs required to be integrated back into society successfully. In addition, we provide a safe protective place for them to live, grow and experience the unconditional love of God – a place where they can feel valued and esteemed; a place where they can be kids again.

Armor of God provides rescued adults the intensive care and love they need to recover from the traumatic effects of sexual abuse and sexual exploitation. We provide them medical help, counseling, vocational training and all daily needs required to be integrated back into society successfully. In addition, we provide a safe protective place for them to live, grow and experience the unconditional love of God – a place where they can feel valued and esteemed. We provide them with a sense of belonging.

Rescuing a child is just the first step toward recovery. The journey that follows requires much healing and restoration – rebuilding a life emotionally, mentally, spiritually and physically.

There are literally millions of children enslaved in the sex-trade or who have been sexually exploited in our world today. And each child has a story that reveals the damaging effects of sexual abuse. Some children have been fortunate enough to be rescued with only a relatively short time in the industry, while others have been trapped for many years.

Regardless of the amount of time spent in a brothel or in an abusive situation, these children are broken and wounded and need to experience the healing touch of God and His unconditional love.

Armor of God Rescue has a mandate from God to see these children healed and restored from their past abuse.

The Bible says, “The Spirit of the Sovereign Lord is upon me, for the Lord has anointed me to bring good news to the poor. He has sent me to comfort the broken-hearted and to proclaim that captives will be released and prisoners will be freed. He has sent me to tell those who mourn that the time of the Lord’s favor has come, and with it, the day of God’s anger against their enemies. To all who mourn in Israel, he will give a crown of beauty for ashes, a joyous blessing instead of mourning, festive praise instead of despair” (Isaiah 61:1-3a NLT).

God has uniquely equipped and qualified Armor of God Rescue to help bring healing and wholeness to these children, and because of this, they can smile again. They have a chance to dream and fulfill their God-given destinies.

Through our aftercare programs, children are given tender medical attention and helped with any diseases they may have contracted while in slavery. In addition, they receive any other medical care needed along their journey to recovery.

We also provide Godly counsel from our trained counselors. Our amazing staff help kids navigate the difficult waters of their past with the Truth of God’s Word and tangibly express the love of God to them on a daily basis.

A proper education and vocational training are key components for successful reintegration back into society.

Not only are these children and young adults offered medical care and counseling, they are brought to a “rescue home” where they can live peacefully, eat nutritious meals, get a valuable education and play interactive games with other children. In addition, when they reach a certain age, they can learn a skilled trade like sewing, jewelry making, hairstyling, waitressing or cooking.

A proper education and vocational training are key components for successful reintegration back into society. These tools will help equip these young adults to earn a good living and become self-sufficient, keeping them safe from a life of prostitution.

Like all of us, children need unconditional love. At Armor of God Rescue we go out of our way to make every child feel loved, valued and esteemed. We also give them the opportunity to go to church if they so choose. Many of them see God’s faithfulness through answered prayer and hear of His amazing power through personal testimonies, which in turn, compels a large number of them to enter a personal relationship with Jesus Christ!

Because of all our faithful supporters, we’re able to bring freedom, hope and restoration to hundreds of children once enslaved in the sex-trade industry.

Our mission Part 2

WHAT IS A PREVENTION CHILD?

A Prevention Child is an at-risk child that Armor of God Rescue helps support financially so that they’re protected from being lured or forced into the sex-trade. Your monthly support will help provide a Prevention Child with a good education, healthcare, regular food assistance, hygiene awareness, financial management training and, in some cases, a place to live.

WHAT IS A RESCUE CHILD?

A Rescue Child is a child that has literally been rescued from a brothel, red light district or sexually exploitive situation, either by Armor of God Rescue or another organization that works closely with us, and has been brought into our aftercare program. Your monthly financial support will help provide a Rescue Child a safe, loving place to live, a good education, medical treatment, counseling, healthy meals, vocational training, clothing, all other daily needs, and a chance to experience the unconditional love of God!

Our mission statement Part 1

VISION

To be the unique leading Organization within South Africa visibly enabling people and communities to improve their quality of life and to combat human trafficking in South Africa.

MISSION

Developing an integrated holistic network with all stakeholders to render a multi caring anti-human trafficking service for victims. Armor of God Foundation exists to Rescue, Restore, Protect, Empower and be a Voice for the Voiceless.

OBJECTIVES

  • To protect and promote the interests, well-being, safety and development of children within the context of family and community and to safeguard the rights of children;
  • In order to achieve such objectives the Society shall, inter alias be voluntary by nature and its characteristic shall be reflected in its management;
  • Remain non-governmental and independent confirm its belief in the dignity, diversity, equality and worth of all people;
  • Shall remain a Christian based organization;
  • Provide appropriate and relevant programs in the form and language, which is accessible and acceptable to all the people in its area of operation, irrespective of religion or culture;
  • Render child, family and community centered services in order to: build the capacities and promote the development of all the people in its area of operation facilitate the development of human and structural resources within its area of operation in order to preserve family life and enhance people’s own capacity, self-reliance and the development of community support networks
  • Emphasize preventive, promote and developmental approaches in the planning and implementation of its services;
  • Create public awareness of the needs and rights of children,  awareness of the needs and rights of adult traffic victims; in order to enhance the communities’ and society’s responsibility to create a nurturing environment for themselves;
  • Take steps to bring about the removal of conditions detrimental to the emotional and physical well-being of the children, families and the community it serves;
  • Seek, create, liaise and I or collaborate and develop networks with government and other organizations;
  • Initiate and undertake fundraising and public relations activities;
  • Advocate, promote and support legislative and other measures designed to meet the needs and protect the rights of children;
  • Identify, investigate, assess and undertake research in respect of social and other conditions, deficiencies in services and legislation relevant to the Society and the recipients of its services

Executive Summary

Armor of God Foundation were founded in 2009. It is a non-profit and non-government organization. Over the last 6 years this organization served and continues to serve the communities in Mexico, United States of America and South Africa.

Armor of God Foundation offer free holistic care services to the community of trafficking victims regardless of race, gender, age, social and financial status. Today, the need within these communities is growing on a daily basis which has also resulted in the services expanding rapidly to ensure all the identified needs are being adequately catered for. The growing need to be able to prevent trafficking in communities needs to be identified so that it can be adequately addressed.

OUR CALL

It is estimated that there are 42 million men, women and children enslaved around the world today with no hope of escape and no light to their darkness.

The Bible says, “Free those who are wrongly imprisoned; lighten the burden of those

who work for you. Let the oppressed go free, and remove the chains that bind

people” (Isaiah 58:6 NLT).

At Armor of God we have heard these precious children’s and victims cries for help and we are working to deliver them, rescuing hundreds from sexual slavery and committing ourselves to continue.